TomTom research finds Brits desire more fitness guidance

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Not all of us have diet fitness-related degrees, and so unless we invest significant amounts for those which do, we simply move from machine-to-machine hoping for a beach-ready body at some point before we meet our fate. 

Research from TomTom Sports has revealed that most Brits struggle when it comes to maintaining a healthy body; with 83 percent admitting they...

By Ryan Daws, 03 October 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Devices, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Performance Monitoring, Trackers.

Microsoft Band finds employment in helping epilepsy sufferers

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Despite rumours of the demise of the Microsoft Band, the original wearable is being employed to aid epilepsy sufferers in predicting upcoming seizures and help to ensure their safety.

A new program called MyCareCentric is being used for the pioneering epilepsy research developed by a range of partners including Microsoft, the Epilepsy Care Alliance, the University of Kent in the U.K., Shearwater...

Sports wearables require a greater focus on improvement advice

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When most people think of wearables, fitness trackers such as Fitbit come to mind. Whilst these devices are great for tracking your current performance to compare it to your past, they often don't offer advice on how to improve your ability in a chosen sport. 

New research from Lux has signaled the need for sports wearables that go beyond...

KAIST develops ultra-thin transparent transistors for wearable displays

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A research group from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has developed ultra-thin transistors aimed at improving the performance of electronic and wearable displays.

As the IoT era gains ground, there has been robust demand for wearable and transparent displays suited to the requirements of various fields such as augmented reality (AR) and skin-like thin flexible devices. However, the researchers argue that previous technology for flexible transparent displays...

By Wearable Tech, 02 August 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Connectivity, Contextual Data, Data & Analytics.

YONO is an in-ear wearable to predict fertility windows

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A wearable called YONO is now shipping after successful Kickstarter crowdfunding which aims to help women understand their ovulation cycles and predict their optimum fertility window. 

YONO is a silicone earpiece worn during the night which measures and records Basal Body Temperature (BBT) data every five minutes. Since BBT typically increases during ovulation, this data can be analysed to predict when a...

By Ryan Daws, 14 July 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Devices, Health Monitoring, Health & Wellness, Trackers.

Garmin's Approach X40 should be a hole-in-one for golfers

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Garmin is no stranger to wearables and has a solution for most people no matter what sport they partake in. The company's Approach range is specifically-targeted at golfers, and the latest X40 is packed with all the features you need to improve your game whether a professional or an amateur. 

Previous generations of the Approach have featured a smartwatch-like...

By Ryan Daws, 25 April 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Devices, Fitness, Performance Monitoring, Trackers.

Opinion: Healthcare could benefit more from wearables

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The recent focus around wearables at CES pricked my attention yet again. There can be no doubt that wearables are more than just a passing fad, they have engaged consumers in new ways by providing the ability to capture and track health information. But what are we doing with all the data captured by wearables, and how can this benefit the healthcare system?

More often than not, the...

By Nik Stanbridge, 01 February 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Health Monitoring, Health & Wellness, Opinion, Trackers.

Wearable tattoos are here (kind of)

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Although sensors which reside inside of the body are the next big thing, a new generation of wearable technology is arriving due to MC10 which hopes to secure a spot on your skin - like a "tattoo" of sorts. 

This new era for wearables is starting with researchers looking into people who have problems with movement, motor skills, and other neurodegenerative disorders. Although not quite a tattoo like you would have inked onto your skin, the adhesive patch...

By Ryan Daws, 06 January 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Health Monitoring, Implants, Trackers.

Wearable sensors market to hit $5.5bn by 2025, claims research

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The market for wearable sensors will reach $5.5 billion (£3.6bn) by 2025, according to the latest report from MarketResearchReports.Biz.

Market Research Reports' new research covers growth trends, dominating sensor types and a forecast of the wearable sensors market worldwide. Several wearable product types have been launched in the last five years, but a common feature among them is the presence of sensor options as a key enabler for the products' most useful...

By Wearable Tech, 24 November 2015, 0 comments. Categories: Contextual Data, Research, Trackers.